Our mission

Give science.

 
 

Science provides health. Science provides industry. Science provides local solutions to local problems. In short, science provides opportunity.

However, 21st century scientific research requires hi-tech lab equipment and reagents—items that come with a hefty price tag. And the inability to pay that price blocks many of the world’s hungriest, brightest, most innovative minds from pursuing scientific inquiry, whether they are minds working in under-resourced universities in the U.S. or in low- and middle-income countries around the world. Meanwhile, at well-funded labs, unused equipment and reagents accumulate in freezers and storage rooms until they expire or become too old to use and are eventually thrown away. 

 

 

The Reagent Project is one solution to this problem.

At The Reagent Project, we aim to match excess scientific equipment and reagents languishing in labs across the U.S. with talented, under-resourced researchers who need those very items.

Our job begins when donor companies transfer useful, but unused equipment and reagents to our warehouse. We then handle the time-consuming logistics of identifying and vetting scientists in search of the donated items and shipping the items across state lines or international borders. 

More scientists involved in innovative research means more solutions. #givescience

 
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Marcella Flores MPH PhD
President & CEO

 
Graduate students at the Durban University of Technology using a Nanodrop donated by the Reagent Project. 

Graduate students at the Durban University of Technology using a Nanodrop donated by the Reagent Project. 

 

Leadership team

 
Marcella Flores MPH PhD  President & CEO

Marcella Flores MPH PhD

President & CEO

Marcella Flores received her Ph.D. from Columbia University’s Department of Microbiology & Immunology specializing in viral immune responses. She pursued postdoctoral training at the Institute Curie in Paris, before returning to Columbia University to publish her studies on viral immune control. In 2015, she founded The Reagent Project after experiencing first hand the disparity between well funded and under funded labs. Her mission is to level the playing field for scientists so that more scientists participate in cutting edge discoveries.   

Ken Cadwell PhD  Associate Professor; Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, Molecular Pathogenesis. Department of Microbiology

Ken Cadwell PhD

Associate Professor; Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, Molecular Pathogenesis. Department of Microbiology

Ken Cadwell received his Ph.D. in Molecular and Cell Biology from University of California, Berkeley, and performed his postdoctoral research at Washington University School of Medicine, where he investigated the intersection between viral infections and inflammatory disease. He joined the Skirball Institute and the Department of Microbiology at New York University School of Medicine in 2010 where he is currently an associate professor. His laboratory strives to understand how immune responses are regulated during an infection.

Jeanne Kagel PhD  Professor, Mansfield University

Jeanne Kagel PhD

Professor, Mansfield University

Jeanne Kagle received her PhD from Cornell University from the Department of Microbiology. Dr. Kagle has taught biology and mentored undergraduate student research at a Mansfield University since 2004.   In this position, she has cringed at needing to buy many-fold excesses of reagent and seen students’ research forestalled due to lack of reagents.  In 2016, Jeanne became involved in The Reagent Project to help decrease the waste involved in research and help provide reagents for educational experiences that might not otherwise be possible.

Thomas Asher PhD  Program officer, Social Science Research Council

Thomas Asher PhD

Program officer, Social Science Research Council

Thomas Asher is director of several programs related to international education at the Social Science Research Council. These include a fellowship program to support the next generation of African social scientists working on peace, security, and development issues. Dr. Asher has served on an advisory board of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He also has written on participatory politics, the effects of economic liberalization on political life in South Asia, and implications of a transition from a manufacturing economy to a knowledge economy. Dr. Asher holds a PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago and previously served as a research fellow at Human Rights Watch–Africa and acting executive director of Food Aid Management, a food security organization.

 

Charity status

 
 

501(c)(3)

We are 501c3+, check it out here


Form 990  

Check out our Guidestar.org profile here.